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Monthly Archives: June 2017

Keep Electrical Cabinet Cool

Replace Parts as Needed

Many cabinet fan cooling kits are designed to give consumers with a product that is easy to install and will last awhile. That does not mean that all the parts of the product will last for the entire life of your electrical enclosure.

Owners should do routine checks to guarantee that all parts are in working order, and replace parts as needed. Even fan cords that are beginning to fray can have a negative impact on the cooling system of your unit, resulting in your electrical enclosure not being as cool as it should.

Filter Maintenance

Providing routine filter maintenance is vital to keep cooling systems running properly. When a filter is not clean, it is more difficult for the system to push cool air into the electrical enclosure, resulting in an electrical cabinet that will be hotter than average, causing damage to the electrical components found inside. Filters that are reusable should be cleaned on a regular basis, and filters that are not should be replaced as they become dirty.

What Not to do

Individuals that own electrical cabinets may find themselves in a bind if their previous cooling system has failed, and they are waiting on the delivery of their new cabinet cooling fan kit. In these situations, people are advised to avoid several common mistakes that can result in more damage.

Owners should not point their own portable fan into the enclosure. This can result in more dirt and dust going into the space, causing damage and creating a fire hazard. This also may cause the person operating the fan to get shocked, resulting in injury, is a violation of OSHA standards, and it will not have a large enough impact to effectively cool down the enclosure.

Individuals should also avoid pointing their personal portable air conditioner into the enclosure. This poses the same risks that using a fan does, but on a larger scale. For example, air conditioners are known to produce more cold air, but this can also result in more dust being pushed into electrical enclosures.

About Telerobotics and Telepresence

Telerobotics is often confused with the idea of Telepresence (TP). Both have a role to play in shaping the way that future security systems will act. So, what is the difference between telepresence and telerobotics?

Telepresence allows you to feel like you are in a remote location without actually being in a remote location. Currently, it’s about pumping the highest resolution video and audio to the remote viewer in order to simulate the environment in which the sensing/recording equipment have been placed. This type of solution is going to be focused on improving what the camera and microphone can detect as well as bandwidth utilization. Some common examples of consumer tools include Skype, FaceTime and Google Hangouts.

These are all essentially telepresence applications that can be used from your computer or cell phone. Other than the focus on real-time interaction, this is effectively the current state of the surveillance industry. The video and audio feeds are as real time as possible and an individual can theoretically monitor those feeds from anywhere. This likely means that future applications in security for telepresence may be more about access control or real-time interactions in areas too dangerous/sensitive to host humans.

Telerobotics takes the idea from telepresence one step further. If TP is a remote set of eye and ears, TR is eyes, ears, hands and feet. It allows you to not only see/hear the location and interact via 2-way audio but also to interact physically with objects in the remote location and to navigate the TR hardware around the remote space. This capability could radically alter the way surveillance and security are done.

A telerobotics system could be set up to open doors, physically interact with people or even pull a fire alarm if the situation calls for it. It could also be used to greet guests to the facility or any of a very wide set of tasks that would normally require a human being to be in a specific location. No more having views locked to the focal points of a set of cameras and wondering what is happening just out of shot. With TR, the operator can navigate the hardware anywhere in the facility providing exactly the view needed on any desired location without the need for a bank of cameras. For now, the physical limitations of these systems would be the same as most ‘remote’ technologies. Bandwidth between controller and TR setup, the need to maintain the remote hardware/software and considerations tied to getting a TR setup back in operation should it encounter a significant problem while remote are all considerations that will impact anyone using TR for security.

Internet for Reference Tool

First, using the Internet as a reference tool.

While the ease of use, scope of resources, and up-to-date nature of the information available online are collectively invaluable, there are also some downsides to using the web for research. The biggest thing to be careful about is low quality, unsubstantiated material that hasn’t been reviewed for accuracy. Since anyone can post on the Internet, it’s up to you to make sure the resources you’re using are reliable.

How do you deal with that problem? You need to use good, reliable search tools; use good searching techniques (see a recently published article on Boolean Phrase Searching right here on EzineArticles for more on that); and take responsibility for thoroughly vetting any material you use. It can be tempting to trust resources that support your hypotheses, but they need to be checked just as thoroughly as anything else you hope to cite, or more so.

Good, reliable search tools mean, when possible, focusing on information available in libraries, government databases, and similarly vetted information repositories, as well as using the appropriate internal search tools. That doesn’t mean you can’t use Google or Wikipedia, but if you do, check out the website your information is coming from. Does the site itself seem reliable? How about the author? Check their sources and check publication dates to be sure you’re getting up-to-date information.

If it feels suspicious, check to see if there are counter articles debunking the theories or studies presented. If something feels questionable, move on. There are plenty more publication fish in the information Sea.

Once you’ve found something you believe is reliable, the next thing you need to be able to do is properly cite Internet resources. Different style guides will put the information in a different order (check the one relevant to your work to be sure), but in general, what you most need would be:

• The author’s name

• Editor (if applicable)

• Year of publication (of the article or of the webpage)

• Title (of the article or of the webpage)

• Medium (“Online”, in this case, typically)

• Any relevant information in terms of journal name, volume, edition, place of publication and publisher/publishing organization

• The complete URL (http:// and all)

• The date you accessed the source

Creative Names and Passwords for WiFi

Get creative with the name.
Please don’t leave the default string of letters and numbers. While it may feel like you’re keeping the connection anonymous, anybody who looks at the signal strength on their device can make a good guess. Walk down the street with your phone searching for connections, and you can reliably identify most of the homes on the block, just by the signal strength as it peaks and fades. Like the email address you first made in middle school, the wireless router is an opportunity for unprofessional flourishes of creativity. Even if you just want to make a pair of breasts with parentheses and periods, only the neighbors can judge you. Consider referencing pop culture or your favorite book series, and you may become the coolest person at the next neighborhood block party.

Some people use their network name as a way to send messages to neighbors, which can come off as passive aggressive. “PickUpYourDogPoo” may get a laugh from neighbors who share your frustration, but someone who takes offense could respond unpredictably. To get a more consistently positive response, stick to puns and pop culture like “Hide Yo Kids Hide Yo WiFi.”

Get creative (in the right way) with the password.
When making passwords for your different online accounts, you often have to include capital letters, numbers, and symbols. The result is that people have been trained to think of passwords as variations on single words. Substituting an “at sign” for the letter “a,” however, doesn’t make a password significantly more secure. Similarly, it’s usually the first letter of a password that we capitalize. These passwords are also tedious to explain to guests, since you have to explain all the substitutions and which letters are capitalized. Instead of depending on numbers and symbols, think of a string of three random words. Unrelated words are much harder to guess than the usual substitutions and password variations. Ideally, your WiFi password should be very difficult to guess and very easy to explain to guests.